Categories
Uncategorized

7 Tips For Spending Money Wisely

7 Tips For Spending Money Wisely

For some people, financial struggles are due to not bringing in enough money. For many others, though, the problem comes from not spending money wisely or from spending more money than they make.

According to Time, nearly 73% of Americans die in debt.

In this article, we’ll take a look at 7 ways that you can start better spending the money you earn in order to help you reach your financial goals.

 

Get on Track to Start Investing in 14 Days

Participate in my 14-Day Financially Fit Challenge

 

 

1.  Track Your Finances

Before you can start figuring out how to spend money more wisely, you first need to understand where your money is going. Make a budget and track both your income and your expenses. Once you know where your money is going, you can start looking for opportunities where it could be better spent.

2. Think About the Long-Term Benefits and Drawbacks of Purchases

Far too many purchases are impulse decisions. While this is fine when it’s a $1 chocolate bar at the supermarket, it becomes a problem for larger purchases. Before you buy something, think about how it will affect you in the future.

How long is it going to last? Is it going to put you in debt? Is the value you will get out of it over its lifetime worth the cost?

These are questions you can use to determine if something is really worth buying.

Categories
Uncategorized

How a Genius Is Different from a Really Smart Person

The most intelligent two percent of people in the world. These are the people who qualify for membership in Mensa, an exclusive international society open only to people who score at or above the 98th percentile on an IQ or other standardized intelligence test. Mensa’s mission remains the same as when it was founded in Oxford, England, in 1946: To identify and nurture human intelligence for humanity’s benefit, to foster research in the nature of intelligence, and to provide social and other opportunities for its members.

Nautilus spoke with five present and former members of the society: Richard Hunter, a retired finance director at a drinks distributor; journalist Jack Williams; Bikram Rana, a director at a business consulting firm; LaRae Bakerink, a business consultant; and clinical hypnotist John Sheehan.

Together, they reflect on the meaning of genius, whether it can be measured, and what IQ has to do with it.

(RH = Richard Hunter, JW= Jack Williams, LB = LaRae Bakerink, BR = Bikram Rana, JS = John Sheehan)

Let’s start with the basics: Are you a genius?

RH: Ha! If you pass that test, all it proves is that you have a certain IQ. That is not the same as making you an intelligent person, never mind a genius. You can have a very high IQ and be a complete idiot.

BR: No! How different could I be from the 97th percentile? I think hard work is what really separates you from others. I don’t think you can be a genius without achievement. You know people at the very top work doubly as hard as 90 percent of people in the same profession. Take somebody like Cristiano Ronaldo. He probably works 20 hours more than someone who is outside the top-20 soccer players.

JW: I think being a Mensan means I’m good at logic, but that’s it. I don’t think I am worthy of the same term used to describe Einstein. Genius is moving something forward. Evolving.

JS: I don’t know. I’m not comfortable with saying I am a genius. I knew that the scores on my tests, very early in life, identified me as gifted. I finished high school at 14, and finished my undergraduate and graduate degree in college at 19.

LB: No. I think that’s kind of arrogant. I consider myself smarter than the average bear. I don’t look at myself as a genius. I think that’s because I see things other people have done, things they have created, discovered, or invented, and I look at those people in awe, because that’s not a capability I have. I have a really good memory and really excellent organizational ability, but I don’t consider those things genius. I see genius as creativity.

Is Mensa an organization for geniuses?

RH: I think it’s a very narrow definition of genius.

BR: I think it’s for people with high IQs. I think genius is more complex: You need to have intelligence, but you need to put that to the test. I think it is for people who are aware of how well they are doing at that point. And who also want to see whether they can join any other organizations where they will find more like them.

JS: I think people view it as a place where intelligence is valued, and understood, where they are valued and understood. Our society is an extroverted society. In Mensa the reverse is true. The more gifted you are the more likely to be an introvert. People who all of their lives have felt socially marginalized and uncomfortable because of their gifts are suddenly in a place where that won’t happen.

LB: I think what sets Mensans apart is that they are willing to join, rather than anything else. Some people take the test and never join. One in 50 people qualifies to be a member, so we could have millions of members. But we only have 56,000, I think. It is a social club.

Can you describe a typical member of Mensa to me?

JW: You see the same people in any place of social gathering, like a bar. It just so happens that all those people have high IQs. You’re more likely to find someone who is interested in black holes than you are reality TV. There are definitely people who have that social awkwardness you expect to come with this sort of thing, but once you get past that, it’s just like chatting to different people in a bar—or at least, in 9 out of 10 cases.

JS: Can you describe a member of the general population to me? When I joined Mensa I really wondered if I would meet anyone like me, and the fact is that I came to realize, bar that one exception of giftedness, which we all have, that’s pretty much the only common denominator. We have judges, lawyers, artists, musicians, first-responders… That’s what is so great about Mensa.

LB: It is such a diverse organization though. You would have no idea what anyone’s occupation is unless you asked. A Mensa member wants to belong to a community like them.

Can you define “genius” for me, or describe what a genius is?

RH: An exceptional ability perhaps? That would satisfy if you were a member of Mensa—you know you have an exceptional ability in IQ if you get in to it. It is one type of genius, but genius takes many forms. An example would be Dave Johnson. He was a famous decathlete in the 80s and 90s. He was clearly a genius athlete: He ran, he could throw javelin, he could do all these things, and he won the Olympic gold decathlon. That must be genius in the sporting field. I am nothing like Dave Johnson—it is far more complicated than one thing or another.

Categories
Uncategorized

Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start writing!